Dear “Author Who Cringes At The Thought Of Socialising”…

I get that authors are busy… but so is everyone else.

We all have 24hrs in a day, and if you as an author can’t make time for someone who has taken their time to contact you after spending their time reading your book, then at least hire or assign someone (PR Manager) to do so. Because it’s just rude.

This is where social media helps.

I understand a lot of authors are very reclusive, but if something about your book struck deep in your reader, deep enough for them to want to reach out, there should at least be a platform for them to do so.

A lot of people recommend an official author page or website. And these are helpful resources. But they aren’t always practical. It’s better not to have a facebook page than to have one which isn’t active, where you never respond to messages (I learnt that the hard way).

Some publishers and book distributors such as Amazon and smashwords offer author pages. On Goodreads, you could start a blog if it’s something you’re interested in. And if you pick a couple of sites you know you’ll be active and available on, that is easier to manage, less overwhelming and generally better than having an official site and accounts on every social media platform. Plus, your audience knows exactly where to find you.

P.S. if having all those platforms works for you, then go for it. If not, I hope this helps.

Glasses: Also a writing tool

 "...And one sunny spring morning, I awoke to find my glasses missing a screw."
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To all those who wear glasses… you know what it’s like when your glasses just don’t sit right.

For those fortunate enough to never experience such discomfort, wearing glasses that don’t sit right can be really frustrating, especially when you’re writing.

Besides typing, I like to write, draw, and doodle in my notebooks. And recently, my glasses keep sliding off my face. But I get ahead of myself. It all started when…

I travelled for a few months, and got locked down abroad without my spare glasses. One sunny spring morning, I awoke to find my glasses missing a screw. (#crying)

It relieved me to find the screw about an hour later. I fitted it back, thinking that was over and done with.

Until my glasses started zooming in.

I’d be reading, and after a couple of minutes, my glasses would creep down my nose, toward the page. It got steadily worse, and by the time I returned after the travel restrictions were lifted, I was literally having to hold my glasses in place.

Clearly an inconvenience.

And for those wondering, I don’t wear contacts because my eyes water a lot.

Anyway, many reading and writing blogs touch on tools, apps, and equipment creatives need. But I don’t think I’ve ever seen any which touch on glasses. And I know I’m not the only creative who wears glasses (or has had an interesting experience with them).

Glasses are a tool to aid your sight. They’re meant to make your visual experience better, not worse. And I know there are a lot more issues that occur with glasses than them just not sitting right. Things like getting the right prescriptions, and the right shape of frames to fit your face, and the right size so the lenses cover at least 70% of your field of vision. And let’s not even go into tinting and glares.

So, there are many, many things to deal with when talking about glasses. This is just to remind you that glasses are also a writing tool, and as a reader, writer, or just a basic human being, remember to get your glasses sorted.