Get feedback!

It is commonplace for new writers to be protective of their work. And there’s nothing wrong with that… except that it robs a writer of opportunities to improve their craft and story.

Feedback from peers and mentors is invaluable, especially in the early stages of your writing career.

When you open your work up to others you trust and admire, others with knowledge and experience in the craft, you put their expertise to work for you. Now, that’s priceless!

Some simple ways to get feedback include:

a. finding a mentor

b. finding a critique partner (or partners)

c. joining a writing group

d. sharing free content on your blog or social media (though I would only recommend this to those with a thick hide).

The honest truth is, getting feedback can be brutal sometimes… but the key is to pick out the useful, constructive advice, and run with it. In the end, it’s all about your success.

Can Your Readers Relate With You?

The number one reason readers buy books is because they know the author.

This doesn’t always mean the reader is a friend of the author. Sometimes, the reader may have read other books by the author, heard them speak or interviewed on a podcast, radio or television. They might have visited the author’s blog or followed them on social media. A connection is made, and this drives readers to the author’s books. 

This is the reason for the “about the author” section in books. Readers want to know who the book came from. They want to know the author is an actual person, just like them. That automatically makes the author relatable. They’re human. And once a reader can connect to an author on that level, it becomes easy to persuade them to buy your book. 

Who the author is plays a big part in the success of their book. If a specialist gynecologist were to write a book on menopause, it’s more likely to be bought by people experiencing said ailment than if a baker who experienced menopause wrote the book. This is simply because the specialist is just that. A specialist! 

Who you are affects how people receive your book. 

Growing up, I never truly belonged anywhere because of my mixed heritage (and the discrimination I faced due to it). For many years, I struggled to fit in because I was too light to be black. Then I moved to the U.K. where I was too dark to be white. And this was part of what formed the basis for Age of The Anathema. I’m a mixed-race author writing about people being persecuted for being mixed race. And one comment I got back when Tainted came out, was by a mixed-race woman who said: “… finally, we have someone who will speak up for us.”  

She bought and read the book because the author was relatable. 

So, as an author, stop and ask yourself:

“Can my readers relate with me? Or am I just another author to them?” 

Glasses: Also a writing tool

 "...And one sunny spring morning, I awoke to find my glasses missing a screw."
***

To all those who wear glasses… you know what it’s like when your glasses just don’t sit right.

For those fortunate enough to never experience such discomfort, wearing glasses that don’t sit right can be really frustrating, especially when you’re writing.

Besides typing, I like to write, draw, and doodle in my notebooks. And recently, my glasses keep sliding off my face. But I get ahead of myself. It all started when…

I travelled for a few months, and got locked down abroad without my spare glasses. One sunny spring morning, I awoke to find my glasses missing a screw. (#crying)

It relieved me to find the screw about an hour later. I fitted it back, thinking that was over and done with.

Until my glasses started zooming in.

I’d be reading, and after a couple of minutes, my glasses would creep down my nose, toward the page. It got steadily worse, and by the time I returned after the travel restrictions were lifted, I was literally having to hold my glasses in place.

Clearly an inconvenience.

And for those wondering, I don’t wear contacts because my eyes water a lot.

Anyway, many reading and writing blogs touch on tools, apps, and equipment creatives need. But I don’t think I’ve ever seen any which touch on glasses. And I know I’m not the only creative who wears glasses (or has had an interesting experience with them).

Glasses are a tool to aid your sight. They’re meant to make your visual experience better, not worse. And I know there are a lot more issues that occur with glasses than them just not sitting right. Things like getting the right prescriptions, and the right shape of frames to fit your face, and the right size so the lenses cover at least 70% of your field of vision. And let’s not even go into tinting and glares.

So, there are many, many things to deal with when talking about glasses. This is just to remind you that glasses are also a writing tool, and as a reader, writer, or just a basic human being, remember to get your glasses sorted.

Plan And Plan Again

Don’t just be a writer who only practices writing. Pick a project and work on it. A writing project, like a book, is good but shouldn’t end whenever it ends. Projects have time frame. Give yourself time when you should be done.

Read More

Get The Ink Bleeding

As simple as this writing key reads, it is where most aspiring writers like you face a great challenge.  You stare at the blank paper or screen before you and ask, what exactly do I write first?

Read More

Where Should You Write?

Imagine a comfortable chair, a table of exactly the right height, a computer and a mug of hot coffee or a bottle of booze. Then imagine you cannot afford any of them.

Read More

New book for the new year!

As we kick off into the second month of 2021, we have a great new book which will aid you on your journey to making your dreams a reality.

Dawn Lulu-Briggs’ debut book, Words, Sweeter Than Honey: A simple guide to understanding affirmations gives powerful and easy-to-remember phrases to change your life… Literally.


WORDS, SWEETER THAN HONEY

A Simple Guide To Understanding Affirmations

Synopsis:

In a world where everything seems hard or tough it is my sincere wish that anyone who comes across this book gets to smile. My intention is to soften the edges, one beautiful mind at a time.

Each word is carefully thought out and each affirmation is written and sent with love.


Out on February 6th, 2021 in print and ebook format.

2021-02-06T12:00:00

  days

  hours  minutes  seconds

until

Release Date


ABOUT THE AUTHOR’S :

Dawn Lulu-Briggs is a self-taught inspirational speaker who has developed enough strength to keep going, no matter what.

She is a resilient, selfless goal-getter, and an emerging thought-leader who never points you in directions or areas she hasn’t walked in herself.

She is fearless and full of faith.

Books are for people

Different writers put pen to paper for different audiences. Some write for their gratification alone, while some write for an audience comprising of more people than themselves.

Read More

Knowing your “Why”.

WHY DO YOU WANT TO WRITE?

Through the holiday period, we’ve been thinking of the best way to set your writing permanently on a more productive trajectory. This year, we wish to start by cutting the assumption that you’re already a writer and ask; Why is writing important to you?

The key word in today’s writing key is why. What is your motivation? This question requires an answer with a perennial lifespan, particularly if you are one looking to make writing a career.

WHY ASK WHY?

Now, think of that song you loved the first time you heard it. You looped it and/or danced to it until one day, you realized the song didn’t move you anymore. Think of that hobby that seemed fun until it demanded your energy when you didn’t feel like giving it.

Creative writing is not unlike every other exercise in the sense that, when what was hobby becomes work, every nerve in your body wants to quit. But you know quitting is one ingredient notoriously bad for a career recipe. It is for this reason that you need a strong why to lean on for motivation and focus on days when creative writing shall lose its juice like an overplayed favorite song… And there will be many days like this.

HOWEVER! HOWEVER!!

You should know that the best and most effective whys are personal answers generated from your dreams. It is tempting to go with popular answers, especially from the writers we admire most. The danger in this is that you’d be running on fuel your engine wasn’t design for.

What have you always pictured as the best thing writing can do for you or help you achieve? In there lie the bricks to build your why. A good why is a solid structure, not just a fantasy wished for. Although, sometimes, some structures can be as simple as a mere desire to have fun.

SUMMARY

Knowing why you want to write has the primary duty of creating a goal you can daily work to achieve. It also lights your embers on the day your ashes are damp. Why is not just a creative writing question, it is the search for purpose and you have the right to create that purpose in every area of your life.

Why do you want to write?

Season’s Greetings

Christmas is a time that quickly reminds us all the reasons we write and want to write some more. It comes to us like hope flying on the wings of love to the climax of perfect joy as the year ends.

As writers, we get to feel this beautiful season even more intensely because it bears remarkable resemblance with Act 3, the Happily-Ever-Afters we chase down to the ends of the stories we’ve been writing all year.

At Chartus.X, we know that all stories are about our beautifully battered lives and how we wish they were or could become. Christmas brings the hope that our wishes can become our realities. 

We appreciate you for staying with us through the year. We know it’s your unintended compliment that we’re doing something right. 

The new year is only a few days away, and all we can say to you is what we’ve always said to you – Write Your Story! Write ambitious Happily-Ever-Afters.

Remember, wishes come true at Christmas time.

We wish you a happy holiday and can’t wait to see you in the new year.