Can Your Readers Relate With You?

The number one reason readers buy books is because they know the author.

This doesn’t always mean the reader is a friend of the author. Sometimes, the reader may have read other books by the author, heard them speak or interviewed on a podcast, radio or television. They might have visited the author’s blog or followed them on social media. A connection is made, and this drives readers to the author’s books. 

This is the reason for the “about the author” section in books. Readers want to know who the book came from. They want to know the author is an actual person, just like them. That automatically makes the author relatable. They’re human. And once a reader can connect to an author on that level, it becomes easy to persuade them to buy your book. 

Who the author is plays a big part in the success of their book. If a specialist gynecologist were to write a book on menopause, it’s more likely to be bought by people experiencing said ailment than if a baker who experienced menopause wrote the book. This is simply because the specialist is just that. A specialist! 

Who you are affects how people receive your book. 

Growing up, I never truly belonged anywhere because of my mixed heritage (and the discrimination I faced due to it). For many years, I struggled to fit in because I was too light to be black. Then I moved to the U.K. where I was too dark to be white. And this was part of what formed the basis for Age of The Anathema. I’m a mixed-race author writing about people being persecuted for being mixed race. And one comment I got back when Tainted came out, was by a mixed-race woman who said: “… finally, we have someone who will speak up for us.”  

She bought and read the book because the author was relatable. 

So, as an author, stop and ask yourself:

“Can my readers relate with me? Or am I just another author to them?” 

Glasses: Also a writing tool

 "...And one sunny spring morning, I awoke to find my glasses missing a screw."
***

To all those who wear glasses… you know what it’s like when your glasses just don’t sit right.

For those fortunate enough to never experience such discomfort, wearing glasses that don’t sit right can be really frustrating, especially when you’re writing.

Besides typing, I like to write, draw, and doodle in my notebooks. And recently, my glasses keep sliding off my face. But I get ahead of myself. It all started when…

I travelled for a few months, and got locked down abroad without my spare glasses. One sunny spring morning, I awoke to find my glasses missing a screw. (#crying)

It relieved me to find the screw about an hour later. I fitted it back, thinking that was over and done with.

Until my glasses started zooming in.

I’d be reading, and after a couple of minutes, my glasses would creep down my nose, toward the page. It got steadily worse, and by the time I returned after the travel restrictions were lifted, I was literally having to hold my glasses in place.

Clearly an inconvenience.

And for those wondering, I don’t wear contacts because my eyes water a lot.

Anyway, many reading and writing blogs touch on tools, apps, and equipment creatives need. But I don’t think I’ve ever seen any which touch on glasses. And I know I’m not the only creative who wears glasses (or has had an interesting experience with them).

Glasses are a tool to aid your sight. They’re meant to make your visual experience better, not worse. And I know there are a lot more issues that occur with glasses than them just not sitting right. Things like getting the right prescriptions, and the right shape of frames to fit your face, and the right size so the lenses cover at least 70% of your field of vision. And let’s not even go into tinting and glares.

So, there are many, many things to deal with when talking about glasses. This is just to remind you that glasses are also a writing tool, and as a reader, writer, or just a basic human being, remember to get your glasses sorted.

When Should You Write?

Your natural proclivity is to desire comfort. You don’t want to do anything until the stars have aligned and the booming voice of the universe says, “It’s time to write, my dear child.” But the question is, when was the last time you heard that voice? Have you even ever?

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Knowing your “Why”.

WHY DO YOU WANT TO WRITE?

Through the holiday period, we’ve been thinking of the best way to set your writing permanently on a more productive trajectory. This year, we wish to start by cutting the assumption that you’re already a writer and ask; Why is writing important to you?

The key word in today’s writing key is why. What is your motivation? This question requires an answer with a perennial lifespan, particularly if you are one looking to make writing a career.

WHY ASK WHY?

Now, think of that song you loved the first time you heard it. You looped it and/or danced to it until one day, you realized the song didn’t move you anymore. Think of that hobby that seemed fun until it demanded your energy when you didn’t feel like giving it.

Creative writing is not unlike every other exercise in the sense that, when what was hobby becomes work, every nerve in your body wants to quit. But you know quitting is one ingredient notoriously bad for a career recipe. It is for this reason that you need a strong why to lean on for motivation and focus on days when creative writing shall lose its juice like an overplayed favorite song… And there will be many days like this.

HOWEVER! HOWEVER!!

You should know that the best and most effective whys are personal answers generated from your dreams. It is tempting to go with popular answers, especially from the writers we admire most. The danger in this is that you’d be running on fuel your engine wasn’t design for.

What have you always pictured as the best thing writing can do for you or help you achieve? In there lie the bricks to build your why. A good why is a solid structure, not just a fantasy wished for. Although, sometimes, some structures can be as simple as a mere desire to have fun.

SUMMARY

Knowing why you want to write has the primary duty of creating a goal you can daily work to achieve. It also lights your embers on the day your ashes are damp. Why is not just a creative writing question, it is the search for purpose and you have the right to create that purpose in every area of your life.

Why do you want to write?

On Modelling…

All readers are drawn to stories about things they recognise: Dreams, Ambitions, Fears, Courage, Dilemma, Safety, Rejection, Hatred, Love, etc. Storytelling is a means of giving people a chance to experience all the things they fear and all the things they adore knowing that they are separated from the troubles or dangers that accompany such experience.

Readers want to read from writers who understand them. And it doesn’t matter if the story is set in Mars or if the characters are animated horse dungs talking about the need for personal hygiene. As long as these characters also live relatable dreams and express similar fears, the readers will always read. And this remains true even in stories with extraterrestrial settings.

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Stretch your creativity

Haven’t we all had our fair share of the crippling writing advice: Write What You Know? The givers of this advice come at you with hard buttocks rendered rigid from sitting so long in the writers’ comfort zone. They don’t ‘waste’ time imagining what is unfamiliar to them and they don’t attempt to tell stories not crafted about characters like them within settings like the ones in which they live.

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Taking A Break

As an upcoming or professional writer, there will be days where the zeal to write is missing or our motivation levels seem very low. Sometimes, this feeling may span from a day and could even linger to a week or more. 

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Introducing our new web novel library!

For those who don’t know what a web novel is, it’s any type of novel that’s published online as a page, a downloadable format (such as PDF), or any other electronic format. 

Some web novels are free-to-read, while others are pay-to-read… and a web novel can very well grow to become a published book! 

We at Chartus.X understand this and have put together a number of stories (with more on the way) for your enjoyment, ranging from a quick 4 min read to over 20 mins of story time. 

With completed stories and those still on-going (chapters updated on a regular basis), you too can join in the fun. If you’re a lover of books and short stories, you’re in the right place.

You can now find our web novels on our main menu, or follow the links below for completed and ongoing stories.

Completed Webnovels 

Ongoing Webnovels

Also, if you’re a writer of novels/short stories and are interested in getting them published with us, simply email chartus.x@gmail.com (re: web novel enquiry) with your name, the title of your story and a synopsis. 

All our stories are copyright © protected and licensed for your enjoyment only.
Please respect the hard work of the author by refraining from copying their work (except for the purpose of adverting it)